Signed Marcello Fantoni Mid-Century Modernist Ceramic Vase With Women

Dutch Golden Age — The Dutch Golden Age was a period in Dutch history, roughly spanning the 17th century, in which Dutch trade, science, military, and art were among the most acclaimed in the world. The first half is characterized by the Eighty Years War which ended in , the Golden Age continued in peacetime during the Dutch Republic until the end of the century. Antwerp fell on August 17, after a siege, the United Provinces fought on until the Twelve Years Truce, which did not end the hostilities. Under the terms of the surrender of Antwerp in , the Protestant population were given four years to settle their affairs before leaving the city, similar arrangements were made in other places. Protestants were especially well-represented among the craftsmen and rich merchants of the port cities of Bruges, Ghent. More moved to the north between and than Catholics moved in the direction, although there were also many of these. Many of those moving north settled in Amsterdam, transforming what was a port into one of the most important ports. This contributed to the lowest interest rates and the highest literacy rates in Europe, several other factors also contributed to the flowering of trade, industry, the arts and the sciences in the Netherlands during this time.

Antiques and Collectables

Tile Gazetteer Index The inclusion of a site in the Tile Gazetteer does not guarantee any availability of public access nor that any listed site remains in existence or is unchanged. This buff terracotta gothic column was made by Messrs H. Perhaps clay was just too commonplace in Sussex to be generally desirable in the form of a top quality building material such as highly-moulded terracotta; certainly the Edwardian terracotta villa at Bexhill E comes as a surprise on the seafront.

Sussex may lack terracotta in any quantity, but it has several nationally important tiled locations including an unusual sixteenth century Flemish tile pavement at Boxgrove W.

Here are the antique Italian pottery pieces. I have done alot of research and cannot find the exact marks. I think they – Answered by a verified Antique Expert Ulisse Cantagalli died in and his descendants sold the company in the s. I believe they are from a dynasty dating from around or ://

Dish with bird, in Islamic-derived style, Orvieto , ca. The colours are applied as metallic oxides or as fritted underglazes to the unfired glaze, which absorbs pigment like fresco, making errors impossible to fix, but preserving the brilliant colors. Sometimes the surface is covered with a second glaze called coperta by the Italians that lends greater shine and brilliance to the wares. In the case of lustred wares, a further firing at a lower temperature is required.

Kilns required wood as well as suitable clay. Glaze was made from sand, wine lees , lead compounds and tin compounds. Sgraffito wares were also produced, in which the white tin-oxide glaze was scratched through to produce a design from the revealed body of the ware. The medium was also adopted by the Della Robbia family of Florentine sculptors. The city itself declined in importance as a centre of maiolica production in the second half of the fifteenth century, perhaps because of local deforestation , and manufacture was scattered among small communes, [15] and, after the mid-fifteenth century, at Faenza.

Potters from Montelupo set up the potteries at Cafaggiolo. In , [16] twenty-three master-potters of Montelupo agreed to sell the year’s production to Francesco Antinori of Florence; Montelupo provided the experienced potters who were set up in at the Villa Medicea di Cafaggiolo by its Medici owners. Deruta ware dish, 2nd quarter of the 16th century, shows the full range of glaze colors Victoria and Albert Museum Italian maiolica reached an astonishing degree of perfection in this period.

Adams Jasperware Biscuit Barrel, Silver Plated

Summerland, California, Ships to: This is a ceramic vase with a textured, pebbled, finish. The hand painted ladies have bold black eyes and jewelry with pale yellow shadows on the figures. The “S” swirls have pale blue accents. Inside, the top is yellow with a blue neck.

Medieval Persian ceramics, in particular, were extraordinary for their technical invention and imaginative, refined iconography achieving artistic results that would be difficult to surpass in the art of pottery.

The art and architecture of Mesopotamia by Giovanni Curatola Book 9 editions published in in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide The artistic traditions of Mesopotamia, or ancient Iraq, are among the oldest, and the richest, in the world. In this flat, fertile land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, the ancient Sumerians created, before BC, the world’s first advanced civilization, and each of the many powers that succeeded them left its own distinctive imprint on the region’s culture.

The broad chronological scope of this illustrated volume, from the fourth millennium BC to the fourteenth century AD, gives us a new appreciation of both the diversity and the continuity of Mesopotamian art history. Its text, written by leading scholars of Near Eastern art and archaeology, provides an erudite yet accessible overview of each major phase in this eventful artistic saga.

The masterpieces discussed in these chapters are depicted in illustrations, most of them full-color photographs, and following the main text is a visual guide to Iraq’s principal archaeological sites, which provides a further black-and-white photographs, maps, and plans. With its authoritative, up-to-date text and this wealth of illustrations, this is an invaluable publication for anyone with an interest in humanity’s cultural heritage.

Illustrating the text are some color photographs of architectural landscapes, monuments, sculptures, carpets, miniature paintings, and ornaments, which transport the reader on a tour of the region and the art produced there over the ages. In addition, the back matter includes detailed notes to the text and an expanded bibliography.

Guide To Pottery & Porcelain Marks

Shaped as a menacing horned sea monster, with its tentacled mouth forming the body of the dish and its tail the handle. Quite heavily potted with blue tinged glaze. All handpainted with black outline and blue; a small putti is about to be swallowed whole! A great collector’s item.

View this item and discover similar vases for sale at 1stdibs – Large vintage Cantagalli vase or apothecary jar with rhythmic floral scroll in brilliant blue glaze, circa s. Measures: 10 .

Cat Mountain, Old Cat Mountain, Zook Dalton, OH ; four 7′ teak bookcases; Ballard Designs handpainted bunny rabbit cabinet; six Windsor dining chairs; sm. Indian drum chair; more. Hans Suren’s “Mensch und Sonne: Arisch-Olympischer Geist” ; L. Van Briggle ewer; Also, four Texas stoneware crocks inc. Five other antique crocks inc. Other original art inc. Royal Doulton V “The Beaufort”; 51 pcs.

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Albarello — An albarello is a type of maiolica earthenware jar, originally a medicinal jar designed to hold apothecaries ointments and dry drugs. The development of type of pharmacy jar had its roots in the Middle East during the time of the Islamic conquests. The etymology of the word is not clear, some scholars consider the Latin word albaris with the meaning of whitish while others criticize this interpretation as such recipients were originally manufactured in wood.

Parchment was white, or bleached white, so that the contents of the jar could be written upon it, the parchment would overlap the upper half of the jar in order to be affixed with a cord and properly seal the contents. Brought to Italy by Hispano-Moresque traders, the earliest Italian examples were produced in Florence in the 15th century, albarelli were made in Italy from the first half of the 15th century through to the late 18th century and beyond.

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Mar 30, Q: This rooster mark is on the bottom. Can you tell me who made this? One of the makers who used a cockerel young rooster mark like this was Ulisse Cantagalli Members of the Cantagalli family operated a pottery near Florence, Italy, beginning in the 15th century. Ulisse and his brother inherited the pottery in They made majolica with Moorish designs, ruby and gold luster and earthenware.

After Ulisse died, his wife and daughter operated the pottery. The pottery and trademark were sold to Amerigo Menegatti, the art director of the pottery, in Useful ware was made beginning in the late s. The pottery closed in Pottery made by Cantagalli is marked just with the cockerel. Login to leave a comment. Join The Discussion Kovels.

Experimental animation meets pottery

Dish with bird, in Islamic-derived style, Orvieto , ca. The colours are applied as metallic oxides or as fritted underglazes to the unfired glaze, which absorbs pigment like fresco, making errors impossible to fix, but preserving the brilliant colors. Sometimes the surface is covered with a second glaze called coperta by the Italians that lends greater shine and brilliance to the wares. In the case of lustred wares, a further firing at a lower temperature is required.

Kilns required wood as well as suitable clay. Glaze was made from sand, wine lees , lead compounds and tin compounds.

Mar 06,  · Marks and Identification of Minton Majolica gaukartifact 6 years ago At first pottery only was made but soft-paste porcelain was produced probably as early as In Minton took his sons into the business and the firm traded as Thomas Minton & Sons. The father died in and John Boyle entered the firm which then became known as 5/5(1).

It is especially famous for the wall paintings that have survived on the interior ceilings and walls, showing, among other subjects, hunting scenes and several zoomorphic figures. Google Scholar Ali W. From the Seventh to the Fifteenth Centuries. Google Scholar Al-Jumaily M. Fauna of Arabia Google Scholar Almagro M.

Category:Italian pottery

Partly from Europe, dating from the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, the exceptional earthenware and porcelain on sale on the site are very eclectic. Objects from all the major European production centres with refined decorations are on offer, including beautiful 18th century polychrome porcelain figurines and the production of large porcelain centers. Antiquity pottery The following are presented in the Archaeology section of the site, rare ceramics, such as prehistoric Neolithic jugs or ancient Roman amphorae in pottery, Etruscan terracotta statues, statuettes of Tanagra or remarkable Greek vases with red or black figures.

Maiolica is Italian tin-glazed pottery dating from the Renaissance period. It is decorated in colours on a white background, sometimes depicting historical and mythical scenes, these works known as istoriato wares (“painted with stories”).

The Italian majolica is so popular that it has been copied and reproduced in countries all over the world. Original majolica has its origins in the port of Majorca. This is the port where majolica pottery was first traded. The region that defines Italian Majolica is a town in Umbria named Deruta. Deruta has produced Majolica since the 13th century. This area in Italy is popular because of the quality of the clay retrieve from the earth in this region.

The clay was gathered from the hills in Umbria. This region still produces Majolica to this day. The superiority of the pottery made in this region has made Majoilca a collectible form of art. The name Majolica is used first as an adaptation of maiolica by Minton in

Aspects of Archaeology: Pottery